Donald Trump Impeached: What Happens Next? - SolidRumor.com

Donald Trump Impeached: What Happens Next?

 Donald Trump Impeached: What Happens Next?

As you’ve very likely heard about by now, Donald Trump has been impeached.

Yes.

Again.

On Wednesday, the 45th President of the United States became the first President of the United States to earn this distinction on two occasions, with Congress voting by a count of 232-197 to impeach Trump on a charge of inciting violence.

This is an unusual case of impeachment, however.

Trump clearly deserves it, having encouraged his supporters to lay siege to the U.S. Capitol on January 6 in order to rise up against a free and fair election that he has consistently and falsely labeled as “rigged.”

But Trump is leaving office on January 20 anyway.

On that date, Joe Biden will be sworn in as Commander-in-Chief.

So… if Trump won’t — or can’t, really — be removed as President via impeachment, what is the point? And what happens next?

The House of Representatives passed an article of impeachment of Trump yesterday afternoon, with the support of 10 Republicans.

This article will now be sent to the Senate.

However, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he will not convene this government body until January 19, which means the impeachment trial will not take place until Biden is officially President.

The trial will take days, if not weeks, to conduct.

Trump will be holed away in Florida at that point.

Yes, the main penalty for a guilty verdict in an impeachment trial is removal from office, which is what makes this a strange case.

But senators could vote to bar Trump from holding office in the future — remember, he has not ruled out running for president in 2024.

And he could also lose his six-figure pension and other post-presidential perks.

Conviction requires two-third of those present.

If all 100 senators are present, this means 67 senators would need cast a guilty vote for Trump, 17 of whom would need to be Republicans.

If this does actually happen, other votes — which will require just a simple majority — on topics such as whether or not Trump is banned from running for office again, will be taken afterward.

“This nation also remains in the grip of a deadly virus and a reeling economy,” President-Elect Biden said late Wednesday.

“I hope that the Senate leadership will find a way to deal with their Constitutional responsibilities on impeachment while also working on the other urgent business of this nation.”

Trump, meanwhile, is clearly trying to come across as a new person now that conviction is a possibilitiy.

He recorded a video last night in which he didn’t mention impeachment… or Biden.

But he did condemn the violence of his supporters in the most straightforward manner to date.

“No true supporters of mine could ever endorse political violence,” Trump said in the video, adding:

“No true supporter of mine could disrespect law enforcement or our great American flag. No true supporter of mine could ever threaten or harass their fellow Americans.”

“If you do any of these things, you are not supporting our movement — you are attacking it. And you are attacking our country.

“We cannot tolerate it.”

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, meanwhile, said the following after impeachment passed:

Today, in a bipartisan way the House demonstrated that no one is above the law, not even the President of the United States.

That Donald Trump is a clear and present danger to our country and that once again we honor our oath of office to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States, so help us God.

And now, I sadly and with a heart broken over what this means to our country, of a president who would incite insurrection, will sign the engrossment of the article of impeachment.

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